Minecraft Articles in The Homeschooler Magazine

July 23rd, 2014 § 0 comments

Homeschooler MagThe Homeschooler magazine is a great tool for homeschoolers or anyone looking for different perspectives around education. The practical tips and inspirational flare will support you at every phase of your alternative learning  journey.

Until now, it has been a print only publication. Recently, however, The Homeschooler  has made issues available as pdf files for only $5 per issue.

Well-respected homeschooling advocates including Sandra Dodd, Michelle Barone and Pam Sorooshian contribute thought-provoking and inspirational wisdoms in The Homeschooler. I also have had the honor of contributing my thoughts in a column entitled, “Getting Tech Savvy,” where I have shared my ideas about the popular game called Minecraft.

Following are excerpts of my articles in The Homeschooler. I hope that you will check it out and consider either a 1- year subscription to the magazine or the purchase of one issue as a pdf to read on your smart phone, iPad or computer.

Excerpt of my article published in the Winter 2013 Issue of The Homeschooler:

Minecraft and the Three R’s

The first full version of Minecraft was released in November 2011 and since then has taken the world by storm. In less than two years, this game has grown by leaps and bounds. Currently, Minecraft has upwards of thirty three million users and is growing at a rate of about 17, 000 new ones every day. Chances are, if you have a child, he’s been exposed to Minecraft.

Despite the popularity of the game, many parents express concern over the amount of time and energy their children spend on Minecraft. Much like the parents of old, who were appalled at the youthful fascination with Elvis Presley, the Beatles and Rock and Roll, they are resisting the hold that Minecraft has on their kids, to no avail. Minecraft is changing the way kids interact in the world, how they learn and how they communicate. Minecraft is a springboard for a change that wants to happen. Like a tidal wave, there’s no holding it back.

With that in mind, perhaps we can investigate what the attraction is and how Minecraft might actually be the tool that your child needs to learn and grow in these ever changing times.

Many of us are so concerned with our child “learning” something that we lose sight of what they already know and are building upon through play. I have observed my own children and countless other children (myself included) as they play Minecraft and have come to the conclusion that the spectrum of learning opportunities is vast. Let’s start with the basics – the 3 R’s, something we all want our children to be proficient in.

Read the rest of this article by purchasing the The Homeschooler Magazine’s Winter 2013 PDF here.

Excerpt of my article published in the Spring 2014 Issue of The Homeschooler:

Minecraft and Social Skills

As homeschoolers we are inevitably asked the question, “What about socialization? How will they learn to socialize in the world if they’re homeschooled?”

We as parents have learned to laugh it off and find comfort in knowing that our children have numerous opportunities for socialization, perhaps more than those of their schooled counterparts. We’ve come to realize that socialization is much broader than what happens in a classroom and we take full advantage of it.

But what about when a child is playing Minecraft, seemingly all of the time? Are they getting those socialization skills? Or are they turning into glazed eyed recluses who don’t know how to communicate with real people? Are we doing them a disservice if we allow them to play Minecraft as much as they like? What about park days and homeschool events? What if they’d rather play Minecraft than go to those social building activities?

At first glance it may seem as if our children are falling prey to a fad; a fixation that not only limits practice of social skills, but also inhibits their ability to interact in the real world. Mass media and many educators would have us believe that we are doing our children a grave disservice if we give our children freedom to explore Minecraft or any other media fully. But is that viewpoint an absolute fact?

Perhaps not. How might Minecraft actually be improving your child’s ability to maneuver in the real world of people, groups and conflict? How might creating on Minecraft actually stimulate self-confidence, problem solving and communication skills?

Read the rest of this article by purchasing the The Homeschooler Magazine’s Spring 2014 PDF here.

Here’s an excerpt of my final Minecraft article found in the Summer 2014 edition of The Homeschooler.

MINECRAFT MODIFICATIONS

In the past two articles we’ve explored the many ways that children learn as they play the blockbuster hit, Minecraft. We’ve examined how the game can enhance reading, writing and arithmetic aptitudes as well as how it builds self-confidence, problem solving and communication skills.

There is no end to the learning opportunities playing Minecraft affords. And if the game itself is not enough, the addition of modifications has filled in the gaps. Just about every subject can be explored with the addition of mods. Plus, they are free for download from the Internet.

Let’s take a look at a few categories and see what Minecraft Mods have to offer and how they might expose your child to ideas and subjects they might not otherwise consider interesting.

Read the rest of this article by purchasing the The Homeschooler Magazine’s Summer 2014 PDF here.

If you would like to write for The Homeschooler, please find their submission guidelines here.

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